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Periodontal Disease

Periodontal Diagnosis

Periodontal disease is diagnosed by your dentist during a periodontal examination. This type of exam should always be part of your regular dental check-up.

A periodontal probe (small dental instrument) is gently used to measure the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and the gums. The depth of a healthy sulcus measures three millimetres or less and does not bleed. The periodontal probe helps indicate if pockets are deeper than three millimetres. As periodontal disease progresses, the pockets usually get deeper.

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Periodontal Treatment

Periodontal treatment methods depend upon the type and severity of the disease. Your dentist will evaluate for periodontal disease and recommend the appropriate treatment.

Periodontal disease progresses as the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and gums gets filled with bacteria, plaque, and tartar, causing irritation to the surrounding tissues. When these irritants remain in the pocket space, they can cause damage to the gums and eventually, the bone that supports the teeth!

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Periodontal Maintenance

It only takes twenty-four hours for plaque that is not removed from your teeth to turn into calculus (tartar)! Daily home cleaning helps control plaque and tartar formation, but those hard to reach areas will always need special attention.

Once your periodontal treatment has been completed, your dentist will recommend that you have regular maintenance cleanings (periodontal cleanings), usually four times a year. At these cleaning appointments, the pocket depths will be carefully checked to ensure that they are healthy. Plaque and calculus that is difficult for you to remove on a daily basis will be removed from above and below the gum line.

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Causes of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease, also called gum disease, is a bacterial infection that can destroy the soft tissues and bone that support the teeth. The most common causes of periodontal disease include:

  • Gingivitis (gum infection)
    Gingivitis is the early stage of periodontal disease that affects only the gum tissue. Gingiva, commonly referred to as gums, is the soft pink tissue at the floor of the oral cavity (mouth) that covers the roots of the teeth. Gingivitis may result from plaque (a sticky substance made up of bacteria) build up on teeth and may lead to red, swollen gums that are prone to bleeding while brushing and flossing. Injury or trauma to the gums, due to improper brushing technique and certain medical conditions, may increase your risk of developing gingivitis. Gingivitis is reversible at this stage; however, if left untreated it may progress to a more severe form of gum disease called periodontitis.

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Types of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease, also called gum disease, is a bacterial infection that can destroy the soft tissues and bone that support the teeth. The most common types of periodontal disease include:

  • Gingivitis
    Gingivitis is the early stage of periodontal disease that affects only the gum tissue. Gingiva, commonly referred to as gums, is the soft tissue at the floor of the oral cavity (mouth) that covers the roots of the teeth. Gingivitis may result from plaque (a sticky substance made up of bacteria) build up on teeth and may lead to red, swollen gums that are prone to bleeding while brushing. Injury or trauma to the gums, due to improper brushing technique and certain medical conditions, may increase your risk of developing gingivitis. The disease is reversible at this stage; however, if left untreated it may progress to a more severe form of gum disease called periodontitis.

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Signs & Symptoms of Periodontal Disease

Healthy gums have a pink and firm appearance, do not bleed easily, and fit snugly around the root of your teeth. In mild cases, gum disease usually does not cause pain and is hence difficult to appreciate the disease. As the disease progresses patients may develop signs and symptoms of gingivitis which may include:

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Mouth – Body Connection

Oral health is not only important to our appearance and sense of wellbeing, but it also has an impact on our general health. The health of your mouth, teeth and gums may affect your overall health. Gum disease and cavities may be associated with other serious health conditions.

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Periodontal Disease & Diabetes

Periodontal disease progresses as the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and gums fills with bacteria, plaque, and tartar, causing irritation to the surrounding tissues. When these irritants remain in the pocket space, they can cause damage to the gums and eventually, the bone that supports the teeth leading to tooth loss.

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Periodontal Disease & Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis, a bone disease characterized by decrease in bone mass and density, may be associated with tooth loss. As the jaw bone that supports and anchors the teeth loses its density, the teeth loosen from their sockets. Periodontal disease causes bone loss around the teeth. Both periodontal disease and osteoporosis are associated with bone loss.

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Periodontal Disease & Respiratory Disease

Periodontal disease, also called gum disease, is a bacterial infection that can destroy the soft tissues and bone that support the teeth. Recent research has demonstrated an association between periodontal disease and several respiratory conditions.

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Periodontal Disease, Heart Disease, and Stroke

Periodontal disease is linked to serious health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. The beginning of gum disease is marked by bleeding gums during procedures such as brushing or flossing. If gum disease is left untreated for a long time, the disease-causing bacteria may enter the blood circulation and result in various health problems.

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Periodontal Disease & Pregnancy

Periodontal disease, also called gum disease, is a bacterial infection destroying the soft tissues and bones that support your teeth. Pregnancy causes hormonal changes that can increase the risk of dental problems, which in turn can affect the health of your developing baby.

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When to See a Periodontist?

A periodontist refers to a dentist who specializes in the diagnosis and management of gum diseases. A periodontist also performs dental implants and a wide range of cosmetic dental procedures.

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Antibiotic Treatment

Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for the management of bacterial infections. They either kill or prevent further bacterial growth.

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Bone grafting

Missing teeth and severe gum disease can cause the jawbone to shrink over time. Areas of the jaw bone with missing teeth can resorb and lead to bone loss and a decrease in the quality of the bone. Missing areas of bone in the jaw can preclude placement of dental implants to replace the missing teeth. Bone grafting is performed to replace missing bone and to promote new bone growth. The procedure helps restore the normal dimensions of the jaw bone.

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Bruxism

Bruxism refers to an oral parafunctional activity which occurs in most humans at some point in their lives. The grinding of the teeth and the clenching of the jaw are the two main characteristics of this condition, which can occur either during the day or at night.

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Crown Lengthening

Crown lengthening is a surgical procedure performed to improve a “gummy” smile, because of short teeth. During the procedure, excess gum tissue and some bone is reshaped to expose a larger portion of the tooth, for a better smile. In addition, crown lengthening procedures can also be used to create an even gum line for dental crowns and other restorative procedures.

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Gum Grafting

The word periodontal means “around the tooth”. Periodontal disease attacks the gums and the bone that support the teeth. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. If plaque is not removed, it turns into calculus (tartar). When plaque and calculus are not removed, they begin to destroy the gums and bone. Periodontal disease is characterized by red, swollen, and bleeding gums.

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Gum Recession

Gum recession is a commonly occurring dental problem in which the edge of your gum tissue around the teeth tends to pull back towards the root of the teeth. Receding gums makes it easier for the bacteria to multiply in the formed gaps between the teeth and the gum line. Gum recession may damage the surrounding tissues and bony tooth structures thereby resulting in tooth loss if not treated timely.

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Periodontal Scaling & Root Planing

Periodontal scaling and root planing is the most common treatment for early stage gum disease. This procedure is performed either when gum tissue retracts from the base of your teeth or tartar (calculus) forms around the roots of the teeth.

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Pocket Irrigation

Periodontal disease is a dental condition associated with inflamed and receding gums and loss of teeth. Pocket irrigation or oral irrigation is an effective procedure to clean the plaque from between the teeth (interdental) and inside the deep gum pockets (subgingival). This procedure helps in preventing bacterial colonisation in these regions of the oral cavity. The subgingival pockets may also be irrigated with antibacterial solutions to further reduce the population of oral bacteria. Pocket irrigation helps in cleaning deeper areas of the oral cavity where a toothbrush or a dental scraper may not reach.

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Pocket Reduction Surgery

The word periodontal means “around the tooth”. Periodontal disease attacks the gums and the bone that support the teeth. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. If plaque is not removed, it turns into calculus (tartar). When plaque and calculus are not removed, they begin to destroy the gums and bone. Periodontal disease is characterized by red, swollen, and bleeding gums.

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Prophylaxis (Teeth Cleaning)

Professional cleaning of the teeth to prevent gum disease before the progression of infection is referred to as prophylaxis dental care.

Your teeth are continuously in contact with the saliva of the oral cavity. Calcium and other substances present in the saliva help in strengthening and protecting the teeth. The one disadvantage of calcium is it tends to deposit on the surface of the teeth which overtime builds up to form calculus or tartar. This tartar or plaque build-up near the gum line or between the gaps of teeth provides an environment suitable for bacteria to colonise. These bacteria can cause severe gum inflammation and even destroy the gum and bone tissue thereby causing the teeth to shift or fall out. The bacteria may also enter the blood circulation and infect other organs of your body.

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Soft Tissue Grafting

Soft tissue grafting is a treatment used to treat gum recession that has left the root of the tooth exposed. It is a procedure performed to recreate your gum line and to prevent further recession of the gums. Gum recession is mainly caused due to aggressive brushing, gum diseases, previous dental treatments, tooth loss or gums which are naturally thin.

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Office Location

22 Montgomery St, Kogarah NSW 2217

Tel:

Email:kogdent@tpg.com.au

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00AM to 06:00PM
Tuesday 08:00AM to 08:00PM
Wednesday 08:00AM to 06:00PM
Thursday 08:00AM to 06:30PM
Friday 08:00AM to 05:00PM
Saturday 08:00AM to 12:30PM
Sunday Closed
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